Software recall for 80 Cruise self-driving vehicles updated after June collision

Cruise’s 80 autonomous vehicle (AV) software was recalled and updated following a collision involving one of its cars in June, according to recent documents filed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). ).

The recall notice “pertains to an earlier version of software and does not affect or change our current road operations,” a spokesperson for Cruise told FOX Business on Friday.

“Instead, the report explains how the Cruise AV reacted to an oncoming vehicle accelerating in the wrong lane, and how, through our normal course of continuous improvements, the Cruise AVs are even better equipped to prevent this singular and exceptional event.”

According to filings, the crash involving the self-driving cruiser and another car happened on June 3 in San Francisco.

ELON MUSK SAYS TESLA AIMING TO DEPLOY FULLY AUTONOMOUS CARS BY THE END OF THE YEAR

A GM Bolt EV is seen during a media event where Cruise, GM’s self-driving car unit, showcased its self-driving cars in San Francisco, November 28, 2017. (REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters Photos)

While the Cruise AV was making an unprotected left turn, the “reflexive planner” safety feature of the older version of the autonomous driving system forced the vehicle to brake hard to avoid a predicted frontal collision with an oncoming vehicle. “traveling well over the speed limit in a restricted right-turn/bus-only lane,” the filings state.

The oncoming car collided with the Cruise AV’s “rear right panel” after the oncoming car “suddenly” exited the right-turn lane and drove through the intersection, documents say deposited. During the incident, the self-driving system had to “decide between two risk scenarios and choose the one that presented the least potential for a serious crash at the time,” Cruise determined, according to the documents.

Autonomous taxi cruise

According to filings, Cruise temporarily disabled unprotected left turns on its self-driving car fleet as a precaution after the crash. Cruise said a police report said the other vehicle was “the most at-fault party.” The majority-owned General Motors startup released a software update patch in early July and gradually reintroduced unprotected left turns thereafter.

DRIVERLESS CAR STARTUP ARGO AI TO LAY OFF 150 WORKERS

The recalled old software may not have “predicted correctly nor been responsive enough to the sudden change in course” of a road user in such “rare circumstances”, according to the filings. In more than 123,000 left turns unprotected by Cruise’s AVs before the software update, only one such incident occurred, Cruise said in the documents. The scenario “would not happen again” after the software update, Cruise said, according to the filings.

Cruise car on the street

After testing its self-driving cars in San Francisco for years, GM-owned Cruise now wants to build cars to transport people around Dubai. (Andrej Sokolow/dpa/Reuters Photos)

Cruise’s spokesperson told FOX Business that the company “submitted this voluntary filing in the interest of transparency to the public.” NHTSA suggested filing the recall notice was an appropriate mechanism to notify the public of the software update, Cruise said in the filings.

READ FOX BUSINESS ON THE ROAD BY CLICKING HERE

In June 2021, NHTSA issued a permanent blanket order that requires manufacturers and operators of self-driving vehicles to report all crashes involving self-driving vehicles to the agency.

Comments are closed.